All About the Boxer Dog: Cost, Pricing, Breeders and more


Boxer Dog

Boxer Dog

With their cute and loveable looks, it is easy to see why the Boxer is such a popular breed.

Originally bred in the 1800’s from the mastiff, the Boxer was created to make a smaller dog that could hunt and hold prey. It is the Boxers undershot jaw that enables them to have this firm grip. Although they were also used as a guard dog the Boxer was never naturally suited to this. Instead their athletic build lends them more to agility and obedience.

Since the early years the Boxer has gone from strength to strength. They are popular show dogs with a flashy ring presence and have remained one of the most popular pet breeds for many years.

All About the Boxer Dog: Cost, Pricing, Breeders and more

Personality of the Boxer

Boxers are eternally puppies, if you are planning on getting one then a sense of humour is a must! Full of beans and always on the go, they are known to never grow up.

Do not get a Boxer if you are house proud, like things in order and want a calm, well-behaved dog. Boxers bounce, love life and want to be with you at all times! They often have ‘mad moments’; dashing around the house at break neck speeds like maniac.

Despite this inherent madness, the Boxer would not have achieved such popularity without having several serious plus points. Despite their outgoing personality, they can be reasonably well trained. They also adore people, being great family members who are superb with children. They are a breed that wants to be with people so if you are not able to spend quality time with your dog each day then a Boxer is not for you. Saying this, if you have the time then a Boxer makes a great family pet.

One point to bear in mind though is that while Boxers are generally great with people (providing they have been well socialized), there are reports of aggression towards other dogs especially in female Boxers. If you plan on having more than one Boxer then a male and female pairing is best.

Grooming a Boxer

Due to their short coat, grooming Boxers is an easy affair. Use a rubber curry comb to remove dead hair. This, followed by a wipe with a cloth to keep the coat nice and shiny is all they need once a week.

Size of a the Boxer

The Boxer is a medium sized breed. Males mature at around 24 inches at the withers whereas females are slightly smaller at 22 inches. They are muscular too, with a weight range of 65-80lb for males and 50-65lb for females.

How much exercise does a Boxer need?

Boxers need a good walk each day to get rid of their pent up energy. Puppies will not need as much exercise when they are growing as it can damage their bones, this can be gradually increased as they mature. As an adult, allow for at least an hour a day which can be split over two walks. While some of this can be at a brisk walk, they will benefit from some off the lead free running too.

Remember that the Boxer is a brachycephalic breed (short faced) and as such is prone to over-heating. Avoid exercising your Boxer in very hot weather to avoid this. If the weather is very hot, exercise early in the morning or late at night when it is cooler and consider reducing the amount.

What should I feed a Boxer?

Your Boxer will do best on a good quality diet. Cheaper brands are often full of ‘fillers’, carbohydrates that have little nutritional benefit for your dog. Look for foods that have a high real meat content and use high quality ingredients. Boxers can be prone to grain allergies and if so, feed a grain free diet. Many brands now grain free alternatives.
Puppies should be fed a specialist puppy formula to accommodate their different nutritional needs. Most Boxers have a good appetite and as such can be prone to obesity. Do not let them become overweight, this can have serious health implications.

Boxer Dogs

Breeders – Where can I get a Boxer?

Due to their popularity and boisterous nature, sadly many Boxers end up in rescues. Sometimes this can be through no fault of their own, it is simply due to a relationship breakdown or loss of housing. Giving a rescue Boxer a home is a very rewarding experience so if you can, please consider this option.

If you have your heart set on a puppy, do your research when looking for a breeder. Avoid searching online on fee ad sites or buying from a pet shop. Many of these puppies will be produced by puppy farms or backyard breeders, people looking to make a quick buck by breeding and caring little for their health or welfare.

Instead, contact a breed club to find out what breeders are in your area. A good breeder will question you, they care about where their puppies end up. They will also not have puppies available on demand, you may have to go on a waiting list. However all of this will be worth it for a healthy, well reared puppy.

Parents should be tested for hip dysplasia. This condition is where the ball and socket part of the joint is malformed, leading to pain and lameness. As it is hereditary, by screening breeding stock the chances of it being passed on to puppies is reduced. As heart disease is also prevalent in the breed, the parents should also be checked by a cardiologist before they are bred from.

How much does a Boxer cost?

Expect to pay between 750 and 1000 euros for a Boxer puppy. Show quality puppies or those that can be bred from (many breeders place endorsements on their puppies to prevent progeny being registered) will be at the higher end of the spectrum.

Well-reared puppies will have been wormed and if old enough, vaccinated too. They should have been well socialized and friendly. Always ask to see the mum with the puppies and ensure that you receive the correct paperwork on collection.

One thing to bear in mind with Boxers is that they are prone to health problems such as heart defects or cancer. Insurance is recommended for any breed of dog for peace of mine, yet with this breed it is considered essential.

Should you get a Boxer?

If you are looking for a fun, loyal and inquisitive family pet then the Boxer may be the dog for you. Do not get one if you want a dog that sits quietly in the corner, calm Boxers are a rarity indeed. However if a puppies playful character appeals to you then they may be ideal. After all, Boxers rarely grow up!

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